Passing Time

June 28, 2017

BW photograph of the sun setting behind the Olympic Mountain Range-first in a series.

Copyright 2017 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

BW photograph of the sun setting behind the Olympic Mountain Range-second in a series.

Copyright 2017 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

BW photograph of the sun setting behind the Olympic Mountain Range-third in a series.

Copyright 2017 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

BW photograph of the sun setting behind the Olympic Mountain Range-fourth in a series.

Copyright 2017 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

Watching the sun set is a particularly good way to spend time.  This is looking west from the Sky View Observatory, which is in the Columbia Center in Seattle, WA.  The Seattle Needle is visible in the lower right corner of some of the photographs-that provides a perspective on the height of the Columbia Center.  The Olympic mountain range forms the horizon.

Take care.

Time

June 15, 2017

BW photograph of a boarding house at Oregon Ridge looking west.

Copyright 2017 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

Time is a frequent subject of this blog.  The photograph above is one of the bachelor boarding houses at Oregon Ridge-a structure I have been photographing for well over a decade now, maybe two.  This is a view looking west.

BW photograph of a boarding house at Oregon Ridge looking east.

Copyright 2017 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

One of the reasons for repeatedly writing about time is because there are so many markers of its passage.  This is a view looking east.  Over that decade +, this once somewhat elegant-in-its-utility structure has certainly decayed.  The renewal and growth of the late spring/early summer flora provides significant contrast and calls attention to the consequences of time.  At some point, this foundation will no longer able to support itself and will then need some type of brace/reinforcement or it will crumble.

Much like us as we, too, grow older.

Take care.

Age

December 7, 2016

BW photograph of an abandoned mill.

Copyright 2016 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

The current year is rapidly drawing toward a close, and the new one will soon arrive.  Along the way, we have gotten older.  Wiser is a matter of perspective.

BW photograph of a Master lock on a rusted hasp.

Copyright 2016 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

Many issues will carry over from 2016 into 2017, and exactly what comes with the change in the calendar has yet to be revealed.  We have certainly laid the groundwork for a bit of a rough go, yet there is reason to be hopeful.

BW photograph of a water bottle laying atop dried autumn leaves.

Copyright 2016 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

2016 was certainly one for the books in terms of global violence (although Steven Pinker would argue that there were much more violent periods in human history), the rancorous election season (although, again, there have been others that could be considered as nasty), and most certainly as one that will be the overall warmest on record (which also makes this conversation one to follow).

In relation to the above points, and one that provides that glimmer of hope, is the Army Corps of Engineers having recently denied the final permit for the completion of the Dakota Access Pipeline.  This decision highlights the value of committed protest.  Such diligence and efforts will most certainly be needed going forward as the incoming administration has vowed to review that decision, along with the previously denied Keystone XL pipeline.

Wood rots, steel rusts, leaves decay, but plastic lasts forever.

We need to do our part.

Take care.

108

August 16, 2016

BW photograph of the sun rising onto Harbour East in Baltimore, Md.

Copyright 2016 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

The forecast for today in the Baltimore/Washington region called for temperatures in the high 90s with a heat index of 108 degrees.  I do not know if we hit that mark, but it sure was hot and humid.  A fairly decent thunderstorm rolled though during the afternoon.

BW photograph of the East Promenade in Portland, Maine

Copyright 2016 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

Temperatures were in the 90s with high humidity in Southern Maine over this past weekend as well.  The above photograph is from the East Promenade, which is in Portland, Maine.  It was made on Friday when it was quite uncomfortable to be outside.

BW photograph of Front Street in Bath, Maine.

Copyright 2016 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

A bit of rain fell early on Saturday, which made for pleasant walking in the downtown area of Bath, Maine.  However, the thermostat registered into the mid-80s with a return of the humidity on Sunday.  That was not so pleasant.

“Decent”, “uncomfortable” and “not so pleasant” are, of course, relative terms.  A thousand miles away from Baltimore, flooding in Southern Louisiana has reached proportions exceeding those which occurred during Hurricane Katrina in 2005.  Going a bit more than 2500 miles west from Baltimore, the Clayton wildfire is burning in Northern California.  A man suspected of arson has been arrested in connection with that fire.

It is important to remember that weather is local and transient.  Climate change is enduring and global.  As documented here in an article entitled “Hottest ever June marks 14th month of record-breaking temperatures”, we are now in a very long run of high temperatures that are definitely not localized.  The wildfires in California are symptomatic of the years-long historic drought in that part of the country.  We are now moving into the prime of hurricane season for this part of the world.

Yes, it is hot, humid, and dry, except for where and when it isn’t.

Take care.

 

Time/Age

August 10, 2016

BW photograph of the remains of the first Bachelor Boarding House at Oregon Ridge.

Copyright 2016 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

As time moves on, all things age.

Whether that results in a decrease in performance or appearance, really does depend on the degree of maintenance applied.  For example, Michael Phelps has now won 25 medals, 21 gold, over a span of four Olympics.  Much work has been done in order to make that happen.

BW photograph of the remains of the second Bachelor Boarding House at Oregon Ridge.

Copyright 2016 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

On the other hand, the photographs here are from Oregon Ridge, a park I have visited many, many times and have documented over the past decades.  There is not much left of the Boarding House buildings now, time and age have exacted their toll, as there has been minimal effort applied to their upkeep.  If interested, there are multiple posts about Oregon Ridge through the years herein-click on the “Architecture” link to the right to find them.

I am usually accompanied by a sense of melancholy when walking around Oregon Ridge-it is a place that, for me, makes time and age an acute experience.

Take care.

Boundaries Redux

July 16, 2016

BW photograph of a room in a hotel being deconstructed as seen through a chain link fence.

Copyright 2016 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

This is an addendum to the earlier post entitled “Boundaries”.

Xenophobia and the resultant stereotyping seems to be driving a great deal of current rhetoric and behaviour, which includes the creation of the various boundaries as discussed in that earlier post.  Next week is the Republican National Convention, and, given the statements made by the presumptive nominee, one could expect more of the same.  The August 2016 issue of Outside magazine contains a compelling article written by Mr. Jason Motlagh entitled “Skull on a Stake”, which documents a trip through the Darien Gap at the Colombia/Panama border.  The author traveled with a group of migrants/refugees as they attempt the journey to the U.S., and there are many arduous physical and psychological boundaries to be crossed along the way.  It is a recommended read.

I often think of fences from the perspective of being on the outside and looking in toward something desired-a dip in a swimming pool would seem to be an appropriate example given the heat and humidity of today.  Being outside and looking in is the point-of-view of those seeking refuge in the U.S. and other countries-they are moving toward what is seen as a better place.  It is worth considering what you would do under similar circumstances.  When on the inside and looking out, xenophobia would dictate seeing those as a threat.  The above photograph was included as a suggestion to reverse that perspective.  Imagine being on the inside of a fence, looking out, and being able to clearly see, smell, hear, and feel the chaos and destruction from which many are fleeing-life in Syria provides one, just one, of many current examples.  Yes, what would you do under similar circumstances?  Xenophobia is based on fear.  Empathy helps to bring about understanding and compassion.

Take care.

 

 

 

Boundaries

July 13, 2016

BW photograph of a motel being deconstructed as seen through a chain-link fence.

Copyright 2016 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

Fences do serve their purpose as a point of very clear, physical demarcation between one and another.  As such, they define where one can and can’t go…

BW photograph of a Gettyburg Battlefield picket fence.

Copyright 2016 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

as well as creating obstacles which, in turn, make it harder to get from here to there.

Several countries in the European Union have adopted the practice of erecting physical barriers as a means of controlling the influx of migrants and refugees.  The “wall” between the U.S. and Mexico would be another example.  Other countries use legal/psychological barriers-the recent Brexit vote, which was driven, in part, by concerns over immigration, present another means by which to achieve the same end.

Conflict Theory states that there is a struggle for the control of valuable resources, which often have to do with wealth, power, and prestige.  Boundaries are then built/enacted so as to clarify who has access and under which circumstances that access is granted.  In the era of climate change, the ownership and control of natural resources, as defined by some type of boundary, are quite contentious-the reports linked here and here are examples.  In those afore linked reports, land and water rights as established by existing state lines are the issue, fundamentally, because of disputes over the exact location of those state borders.

Critical thinking is a key.  Interestingly, it appears that many Brits sought information regarding their participation in the EU after the Brexit vote.  In 2011, Alabama passed one of the “harshest immigration” laws in the country-this article summarizes the subsequent impact of that legislation.

There certainly are reasons to establish boundaries as they are a means of establishing and maintaining order in any society.  They can provide safety and protection, and that, of course, is often a matter of perspective.  However, it is important to take the time for due diligence so as to carefully analyze motives and to make critically informed decisions based on accurate information.

Take care.