Timing

July 7, 2019

BW photograph of Taugahannock Falls canyon under strong sidelight-the falls are in shadow while the canyon wall is strongly lit.

Copyright 2019 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

Timing, as the saying goes, is everything.

That is certainly the case with photography.  In the photo above, arguably, the most important of the subject matter, the falls, is in shadow, while the canyon wall is brightly lit by the strong, directional sidelight.  Such is often the issue when traveling.  It may not be possible to be at the location at the desired time.  Or, if there at the desired time, environmental conditions may not cooperate so as to allow for the intended image.  When that happens, one must adapt.  The strong contrast presented by the rising sun allows for a textured study of the canyon wall.  Perhaps this calls attention to a feature that may be overlooked when focusing, literally and figuratively, on the waterfall.  Perhaps this is also just a rationalization for a missed opportunity…

In any case, one must remain flexible.  Plans often have to be modified due to conditions beyond one’s control.  More to the point, one must retain control over that which is within reality.  Being adaptable is certainly an asset when so much can, and often does, go “wrong”.  That last word in is quotes because that in itself is a judgment.  It is much better, and more conducive to one’s well-being, to avoid such interpretations and just accept the situation as it presents itself.  In this particular case, it was a gloriously clear morning in which to be on the road.

Take care.

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Falls

July 6, 2019

BW photograph of the top of Buttermilk Falls.

Copyright 2019 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

This is a photo essay with not much text-just a bit of description and explanation.  It was quite warm in Ithaca, NY over the Fourth of July holiday-a local cashier stated that it was finally “warm”, which is more of a comment about the winter.  The sun was bright and hot, especially for this locale (way upper 80s), once the day made the turn into the afternoon.  Therefore, it made sense to awaken early to make the walk along the Buttermilk Falls Trail before the sun fully lit up the day.  The above photo is from the entrance-once in the gorge and nearer the water, the ambient temperature cooled quite a bit.

BW photograph of a section of Buttermilk Falls.

Copyright 2019 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

There are several drops as the water makes it way down through the gorge.

BW photograph of a section of Buttermilk Falls.

Copyright 2019 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

BW photograph of a section of Buttermilk Falls.

Copyright 2019 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

BW photograph of a section of Buttermilk Falls.

Copyright 2019 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

BW photograph of one of the last sections of Buttermilk Falls.

Copyright 2019 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

This final photograph is just before the trail makes a further descent-time, and energy, did not allow for the walk’s continuance.  The “going off the side of the mountain” look is certainly intriguing, though.

Take care.

Six Months

July 11, 2010

Taughannock Falls in winter

(C) Copyright 2010 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

This image of Taughannock Falls was created in January, 2010. Read the rest of this entry »

Evolution

January 15, 2010

Darwin Tulip petals close-up

(C) Copyright 2007 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

I started out as a Nature photographer.

Like many photographers, Ansel Adams was an early inspiration.  I soon gravitated to Galen Rowell and John Shaw, whose subject matter was more in keeping with my lifestyle at the time.   Read the rest of this entry »

In the Beginning…

January 12, 2010

Taughannock Falls in winter

(C) Copyright 2010 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

I have always been interested in photography.

As a child, I would pull my parents’ copies of Life and National Geographic from the magazine rack and become engrossed the pictures.  On occasion, I would even read the articles.

As I grew older and began to hike, backpack, and climb throughout the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, I wanted reminders of the experiences and so photography became a necessity.  I did some research and purchased a state-of-the-art 35 mm film camera with the requisite 50 mm lens (this was 30 years ago.)   Shortly thereafter, I added 28 mm and 135 mm lenses and a small flash.  I was ready for the next adventure.

The only problem was that the ability to buy equipment does not come with the knowledge to use it-I was baffled by all the numbers engraved on the camera and the lenses.  I wasn’t too sure about the ones on the film boxes either.  Don’t even ask about the flash. Read the rest of this entry »