Retreat

July 28, 2018

BW photograph of the origins of the Nisqually Glacier on Mt. Rainier.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

This post is a follow-up to the last regarding the global effects of climate change.  In this particular case, the photo essay herein addresses the Nisqually Glacier, which is located in Mount Rainier National Park.  The photograph above is Mt. Rainier with the peak obscured by clouds.

BW photograph of the Nisqually Glacier path with the low flow of the Nisqually River.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

The National Park Service provides information about the glaciers on Mt. Rainier.  Included are many other links and a time-lapse that demonstrates the “…dynamic nature of glaciers as rivers of ice.”

BW photograph of the Nisqually Glacier path with the low flow of the Nisqually River-looking into the river from above.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

The previous post was about global temperatures and climate change.  Glaciers are another strong source of evidence regarding the impact of the increase of greenhouse gas emissions and the subsequent rise in global temperatures.  Such is the premise of photographer James Balog’s Extreme Ice Survey.  Mr. Balog also used time-lapse photography and video imagery of glacial retreat as a means of presenting visual evidence of climate change.  His work is available via a variety of resources, including this NOVA episode, a TED Talk, and the feature-length documentary entitled Chasing Ice.  It is significant to note that the imagery contained in these presentations is well over a decade old at this point.

BW photograph of the Nisqually Glacier path with the low flow of the Nisqually River.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

The Nisqually Glacier has retreated far up the valley.

BW photograph of the Nisqually Glacier path with the low flow of the Nisqually River-the bridge is to the right.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

The bridge over the valley is to the far right of the above photograph-this was the vantage point from which all of the images herein were made.  The NPS describes the changing nature of the Nisqually Glacier, which at one point extended from Mt. Rainier in the far distance as shown in the previous photograph, down through the valley, and to the site of the current bridge.  This is clearly no longer the case.

Global extremes in temperatures and their subsequent consequential impact, the increase in the severity of storms, flooding, (as an aside, Japan is bracing for a tsunami, which is about to hit areas most recently flooded), and glacial retreat.  Examining the visuals makes it extremely difficult to deny climate change…not that that stops those who do.

Take care.

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Heat and Wet

July 25, 2018

BW photograph of Morgan Run flowing between rocks the day after a heavy rain.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

NPR’s 1A aired this discussion today addressing the record-setting heat being experienced globally.  Mentioned in the report were the fires in Athens, Greece; the 84 wildfires currently burning in the U.S. (including in Yosemite Valley); and that Death Valley, “the hottest place in the world”, set a record yesterday with a temperature of 127 degrees.  Seattle and Phoenix also factored into the discussion.

BW photograph of Morgan Run the day after heavy rain.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

The other end of the spectrum would be the rainfall in the Mid-Atlantic region, which was also part of the discussion.  Flash flood warnings were issued for yesterday and again today in the Washington, D.C. area.  The photographs here are of Morgan Run, which was running higher than usual today…

BW photograph of some sticks laying on a rock after a flood.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

but had clearly receded since yesterday’s downpours.

BW photograph of a broken mailbox after a flood.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

It is important to recognize that both the increased temperatures and rainfall are a reflection of the overall heating of the planet-clear signs of climate change.

Interestingly, I was in Seattle this past Sunday and locals were pointing out that it was quite hot for the area.  However, while hot, it was also dry there.  As such, it was not much of a preparation for the heat and humidity back here in the East.

Importantly, the 1A discussion also included methods by which to cope with the heat and humidity.  This information is particularly helpful for the safety of “vulnerable populations”, but all are susceptible to being adversely affected by these well-beyond-warm conditions.

Please be sure to listen to the discussion and implement the appropriate measures.

Take care.

 

Backdated: July 5, 2018

July 15, 2018

BW photograph looking west down Thames Street before sunrise.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

BW photograph looking from Fells Point toward the Chesapeake Bay at sunrise.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

BW photograph of the City Pier in Fells Point at sunrise.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

I have finally gotten back to completing this post, which was begun on July 5.

These photographs were made early on the morning of July 5.  This area had been under high temperature/high humidity conditions that had pushed heat indexes into the triple digits during that week.  As such, when out and about, it was important to stay well-hydrated so as to stave off heat exhaustion and heat stroke.  While temperatures have moderated a bit, we still have August on the way…

BW photograph of a partially full water bottle atop a granite step.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

BW photograph of a water bottle laying in the gutter.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

BW photograph of a water bottle laying in the gutter.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

BW photograph of a partially full water bottle laying at the base of a street light.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

However, it is also important to properly dispose of the containers for those fluids-especially when single-use containers are employed.  This recent article from National Geographic details the enormity of the problem that plastic presents.  The following is a quote from an earlier National Geographic article:

“The new study, published Wednesday in the peer-reviewed journal Science Advances, is the first global analysis of all plastics ever made—and their fate. Of the 8.3 billion metric tons that has been produced, 6.3 billion metric tons has become plastic waste. Of that, only nine percent has been recycled. The vast majority—79 percent—is accumulating in landfills or sloughing off in the natural environment as litter. Meaning: at some point, much of it ends up in the oceans, the final sink.”

The plastic bottles shown above are four that did not initially make it to a recycling bin on July 4th.  Just as important, two of them still contained a fair amount of water.  On that note, here is some information related to the wasting of water, while this site addresses the worldwide lack of access to improved water sources and the concomitant problems associated with that.

Remember Flint, MI? (And that is not the only city in the U.S. with water issues.)

Take care.

Processes

July 12, 2018

BW photograph of sunlit trees on a mountainside.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

BW photograph of tree trunks against a sunlit background.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

What were once mighty and reaching for the sky…

BW photograph of downed trees laying beside a trail.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

BW photograph of a sunlit downed tree that is decaying.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

BW photograph of a downed tree laying amid some rocks.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

have fallen and entered into the ever slow process of decay.

BW photograph of a downed tree's root system.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

BW photograph of a downed tree's root system.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

BW photograph of a downed tree's root system.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

BW photograph of a downed tree's root system.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

The roots have not proven to be strong enough and/or embedded enough to withstand the decades of stress.  One can imagine the anguish that spread through these communities.

BW photograph of new plant growth within a decaying log.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

BW photograph of a bleached branch laying amid new growth.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

From this, though, also comes opportunities for change and renewal-the outcome of which is often not immediately visible.

Am I really talking about trees?

Take care.

 

 

Holiday Combos

July 8, 2018

BW photograph of many cups and bottles in a trash can.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

I made my annual trek to Fells Point on the morning of July 5th to photograph what was left behind after the previous evening’s festivities.  This post focuses on what appeared to be interesting food combinations-that is if the proximity of product implies togetherness.  With a 7 Eleven right around the corner, it was not surprising to see much of their branded trash.

Bw photograph of an empty gelato bin and a Pepsi Bottle laying at the base of a street lamp.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

How about gelato and Pepsi?

BW photograph of an empty Cuervo bottle and a Pop Tart wrapper sitting on a granite step.

Copyright 2018 Kevin P. Mick Photography. All rights reserved.

And, perhaps most intriguing, Cuervo and Pop Tarts.

Take care.